Approaching BlackHat US 2013 and new Dragon Sector blog

This is a quick reminder that Gynvael and I are going to attend BlackHat US 2013 in Las Vegas next week with the “Bochspwn: Identifying 0-days via System-Wide Memory Access Pattern Analysis” presentation on the second day of the event. The talk is going to largely extend our previous performance at SyScan this year (see blog post), detailing the implementation of our “Bochspwn” project, discussing other approaches to system-wide instrumentation and how it can be effectively used to discover different local vulnerability classes (not just double fetches!) in widely used kernels. We will also provide a follow up on using Bochspwn against open-source platforms (Linux, FreeBSD, OpenBSD), including extensive coverage of our findings there, and last but not least, we will release the Bochs instrumentation toolkit as an open-source project for everyone to hack on. If you happen to be in the Sin City at the time, don’t hesitate to come by and say hi! See you there!

If you are not going to make it this time, expect the presentation slide deck shortly after the conference.

In other news, our CTF team called “Dragon Sector” has recently started their own blog: http://blog.dragonsector.pl/. The website is supposed to feature write-ups from the more interesting CTF tasks we manage to solve during the competitions. With merely four posts so far, the blog is surely going to fill up with interesting posts as we play contests in the near future, so be sure to keep an eye on it.

Cheers!

Changing the cursor shape in Windows proven difficult by NVIDIA (and AMD)

If you work in the software engineering or information security field, you should be familiar with all sorts of software bugs – the functional and logical ones, those found during the development and internal testing along with those found and reported by a number of complaining users, those that manifest themselves in the form of occassional, minor glitches in your system’s logic and those that can lose your company 440 million US dollars in 30 minutes; not to mention bugs which can enable attackers to remotely execute arbitrary code on your computer without you even realizing it. While the latter type of issues is usually of most interest to security professionals and 0-day brokers (not all developers, though) and thus the primary subject of this blog, this post is about something else – the investigation of a non-security (and hardly functional) bug I originally suspected win32k.sys for, but eventually discovered it was a problem in the NVIDIA graphics card device drivers.

Figure 1. My typical work window order, with vim present in the background.

Read moreChanging the cursor shape in Windows proven difficult by NVIDIA (and AMD)